Annual Logan Sq. Zine Fest Zinemercado Highlights Resiliency of DIY Artwork Neighborhood | Chicago Information

Artists Michelle Vega and Sir Charles at Zinemercado in Logan Square on Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020. (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW News)

Artists Michelle Vega and Sir Charles at Zinemercado in Logan Square on Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020. (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW News)Artists Michelle Vega and Sir Charles at Zinemercado in Logan Sq. on Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020. (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW Information)

It regarded somewhat totally different this yr as a result of coronavirus pandemic, however an unbiased zine fest introduced a gradual stream of shoppers, distributors and artists collectively Sunday in Logan Sq. to expertise artwork in particular person, some for the primary time since March. 

Zinemercado, a nonprofit group began in 2016, celebrates principally Latinx DIY paintings with a concentrate on zines, selfmade mini-publications which might be often tackle particular, typically unconventional topics. Yearly, the pageant brings collectively 40 artists from the U.S. and Mexico at Consolation Station, 2579 N. Milwaukee Ave., providing a strategy to join with and assist unbiased zine artists.

Founder and organizer Oscar Arriola says he knew he needed to discover a strategy to maintain the fest going this yr, particularly since a number of artwork conventions, print reveals and commerce reveals have been canceled as a result of pandemic, throwing a wrench in anticipated earnings for DIY artists. 

Along with Consolation Station, Arriola devised a socially distant model of Zinemercado, which is often held open air. Security pointers this yr included a fenced-in space, a one-way strolling path for crowd management, an entrance and exit and hand sanitizer at show tables. Whereas greater than 40 artists often arrange particular person tables on the fest, this yr, two to 3 artists showcased the work of about 10 artists at every of 5 tables. In complete, work by greater than 50 artists was on show.

  • (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW News)

    (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW Information)

  • Zine artwork at Zinemercado on Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020. (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW News)

    Zine paintings at Zinemercado on Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020. (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW Information)

  • Artwork by Jonathan Banderas. (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW News)

    Art work by Jonathan Banderas. (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW Information)

  • Artwork by Jonathan Banderas. (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW News)

    Art work by Jonathan Banderas. (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW Information)

  • Artwork by Jonathan Banderas. (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW News)

    Art work by Jonathan Banderas. (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW Information)

  • Fuerza Creative Studio and Jonathan Banderas. (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW News)

    Fuerza Inventive Studio and Jonathan Banderas. (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW Information)

  • Zinemercado on Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020. (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW News)

    Zinemercado on Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020. (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW Information)

  • Justin Matthew (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW News)

    Justin Matthew (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW Information)

“I’m completely satisfied persons are in a position to come out and expertise people with one another,” Arriola mentioned. “It’s laborious to explain the sensation as a result of we have now been so cooped up this complete yr and frightened of what’s the proper factor to do. Even with this fest, we mentioned it closely.”

Nando Espinosa Herrera, a volunteer with Consolation Station who has labored because the liaison for Zinemercado since its inception, mentioned the group had doubts about whether or not this yr’s fest would occur in any respect. However after their proposal to the Logan Sq. Preservation and Consolation Station board was accredited, organizers crossed their fingers for a superb turnout and good climate — they usually acquired each, Espinosa Herrera mentioned. 

Though it’s too quickly to say how out of doors occasions like Zinemercado will fare subsequent yr, he mentioned it would look the identical, given how effectively individuals adopted directions. 

Artists manning tables Sunday mentioned Zinemercado was their first in-person artwork present for the reason that pandemic hit. They have been keen to satisfy new costumers, see outdated faces and exhibit work created throughout the pandemic. 

Artwork by Made in Chi-Town With Love. (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW News)Art work by Made in Chi-City With Love. (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW Information)

Michelle Vega and Sir Charles, founders of the artwork collective and advocacy platform Made in Chi-City With Love, have been completely satisfied to share their paintings after a protracted hiatus and cancellations that hit them laborious. The collective, in partnership with different native printing studios and presses like Fuerza Inventive, goals to carry consciousness to the inner battle, oppression and lack of sources that result in gang violence in South Aspect communities. The artists mentor youth to interrupt the cycle of violence by artwork. 

“Our work is fairly severe as it’s but when we take the seriousness away and truly check out the creative, now we are able to educate someone from the hood that you are able to do a linoleum block [art piece],” Charles mentioned. “For those who don’t have entry to a printer, we are able to get you entry to instruments. We use this to proceed to inform the narrative and use [artwork] as samples to assist information different individuals.”

Vega remembers touring to Los Angeles for an artwork present proper earlier than the pandemic hit. When reveals have been canceled or postponed, she turned to social media, however it wasn’t the identical.

“It was laborious and upsetting as a result of as artists, we’re depending on pop-ups,” Vega mentioned. “[But] the pandemic pushed us to think about having a backup plan and creating a security internet for ourselves.”

For artist Jonathan Banderas, the pandemic was a time to create and mirror on the occasions of 2020. When the pandemic hit, he drew a satan character in a hazmat swimsuit with a flame thrower in hand and Chicago’s skyline within the background. After summer season weekends of protests and rioting, Banderas created a face crying out in anguish to signify the chaos he felt. 

He additionally displayed his first zine, known as “Machinations of the Thoughts,” a group of all of his unique ink sketches. The again encompasses a sketch of a bruised and bloodied face — a reminder that even with problems with systemic racism and inequities which were on the middle of current protests, expressing these lived experiences and mirroring what is occurring utilizing artwork is necessary. 

Jonathan Banderas (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW News)Jonathan Banderas (Ariel Parrella-Aureli / WTTW Information)

“Irrespective of the way you bear it, all of the scars in your physique, you get again up,” Banderas mentioned. “It’s a reminder of what you could have lived by.”

That resiliency within the artwork group runs deep, particularly in instances of hardship. For zinesters, Sunday’s occasion was an opportunity to carry that sentiment to life past social media. 

The assist of the artists and the thrill across the in-person pageant made all the additional work price it, Arriola mentioned. 

“Regardless of everybody being trapped of their houses, it’s good to have the ability to share work from so many artists from throughout,” he mentioned. “A few of these zines have been created within the final week so it’s very topical.”

Ariel Parrella-Aureli is a contract contributor to WTTW Information: @ArielParrella


You may also like

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *